Way better ‘Taken’ – Silence Review

Was that really 2 hours 30 minutes? Didn’t feel like it…

Silence, set in the 17th Century, is the story of 2 priests in Portugal (Garfield and Driver) who learn that their mentor, Father Ferreira (Neeson) has apostatized. Determined to establish the truth and to re-establish Father Ferreira’s faith in Christianity, the two priests embark on a long and harrowing journey through Japan. Said to be Scorsese’s dream project, Silence is based on the 1966 novel of the same name. Written by Shūsaku Endō, it is considered a classic piece of literature.

And rightfully so.

Considering the fact that this movie consists a lot of preaching, it does not come off as preachy at all. Silence does not intend to portray one side in a positive and another in a negative light. What it does is provide a platform for debate which makes for an engrossing storyline. While most people would abstain from the movie due to its religious subject matter, Silence makes it worth your while, whether you are religious or not.

The amazing cinematography is one of the highlights of this movie. Shooting on film does have it merits. The performances of the leads, from Garfield to Kubozuka (Kichijiro), are distinctive and guaranteed to leave a mark on you. The direction is not something you’d expect from Scorsese, who handles the subject matter with great respect. It ranks among the director’s finest works till date.

Silence is not an easy movie to sit through, partly due to its taxing runtime. But pay undivided attention to it once. It’ll draw you right in and won’t let you out.

Rating : 4/5

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